The Myrtle Beach Experience

In the beginning (1991), the BGA began our annual trek to Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. We decided to go in January because it broke up the winter and, equally importantly, it was cheap. Very cheap. And since any course we play at any time of the year will produce bad scores, we might as well play bad golf cheaply. In fact, out cost per stroke was embarrassingly low.
Well this was so much fun the next year we started going for a long weekend in December and another one in January. We did this for a few years until we got the bright idea of taking a week-long trip in January 1999. Disaster!
We found that our bodies couldn’t stand the stress of so much fun. Mr. Fifteen ruptured an arm muscle and eventually needed surgery; The Commish went down like he was shot and got to ride with an flag designating he was an invalid because he couldn’t walk, and Mr. Four Skins back hurt so much he eventually needed surgery. But, on the bright side, we discovered that a few Aleve tablets let us play all 171 holes—except for Mr. Fifteen sitting out 9 holes on the third day, the day he tore his arm muscle.
Since this physically debilitating trip we have settled on 5 day trips with 4 days of golf. This we have found we can handle without upgrading our medical plans.
In those early years we played mostly skins games and did not keep extensive records. However, beginning in 1995 we began keeping every round on the computer so every shot has been recorded and remembered. If you want to plumb the depths of our futility feel free to check out some of the posted statistics.
Remember, in the BGA there are no gimmes, not even a mercy gimme. I still recall my greatest shot being a 25-foot downhill snake from the fringe to save an El Niño and not record a double digit score. Without having to sink every putt how many of you would have holed out and how many would have picked up like it didn’t mean anything?
Also be sure to check out our unbiased (and unpaid) opinions of various courses and eateries in Myrtle. Your opinions are also welcome. If you send it, we will post it.

Because of the combination of lack of sleep and too much to eat and drink, many of our BGA’s all-time records have been set during the Myrtle Experience. Here are but a few that we can remember:

  • 1995, Lion’s Paw: Modern day 18 hole record of 141 set by The Snowman.
  • 1996, River Oaks-Bear: Rich Streckfus needs 25 putts for 9 holes.
  • 1996, Eastport: CS sets 18 hole putting record of 46 putts (since broken)
  • 1996, River Oaks-Otter: Modern day 9 hole record of Raymond Berry (82) set by The Snowman.
  • 1996, River Hills: New record of 142 set by The Snowman.
  • 1997, Eagle Nest: CS comes to #18, a par 3, with a score of 91 and the chance to break 100 for the first time in Myrtle Beach. Promptly shoots a 9.
  • 1997, Aberdeen-Meadows: CS earns nickname of Mr. Fifteen with his record setting score of 15 on #9; since surpassed.
  • 1998, Eastport: The Snowman needs 7 putts on hole 14.
  • 1998, The Gauntlet at St. James: 6 sand shots by The Snowman on #17 (record since eclipsed). On the very next hole C’mon Thirteen earns his nickname.
  • 1998, The Gauntlet at St. James: Upon seeing #18, C’mon Thirteen Levin says he could take 13 strokes on a hole like this and did. His 13th shot was a 30 yard chip to hole out.
  • 2001, Thistle: the Snowman shoots his Johnny U (19) to establish the BGA’s high score. On the next hole he shoots a 10 to creates the largest improvement on consecutive holes (9); since eclipsed. His 29 is still the record high score for 2 holes.
  • 2003, Eastport: The Commish creates the new record for the largest difference on consecutive holes (14) by scoring a 16 on #3 and following it up with a 2 on the next hole.
  • 2003, Eastport: C’mon Thirteen uses 7 strokes in a bunker on the 8th hole.
  • 2005, Brunswick-Azalea: BC (Mr. FourSkin) establishes 9 hole record
    score of 39
    .
  • 2005, Eastport: The Snowman sets record of 48 putts.
  • 2008, Wicked Stick: Commish shoots 87 for BGA record low score.

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We used to call it a Mid Iron; Today it is a 2 iron